Saturday, June 2, 2012

Why Do Cyberstalkers Make me Use IE-8?

In July 2011, I filmed three videos showing that cyberstalkers who were assigned to censor me prevented Google Chrome from downloading on my computer. See one of the videos at this link called "Hackers Block Google Chrome (Tape 1) Mary Neal." Since then, the computer was wiped clean and Windows was re-installed. In March 2012, cyberstalkers allowed Google Chrome to download, but it cannot be used. (There are three links in this article).  IE-8 continues to be the Internet connection the computer uses, although the icon on my desktop looks like Google Chrome! Furthermore, there is an icon shaped like a head on the left top of my screen. If I click the head, numerous names appear: Awesome, First User, Slice, and Sweetness. Sweetness has an email address attached - . Why must cyberstalkers maintain IE-8 as my Internet browser? How do I get rid of IE-8 and the cyberstalkers who use it?

I will soon be blessed to share news about my handicapped brother's murder cover-up and censorship regarding my human rights work with the world through "Lawless America - The Movie" and Press TV. See the announcement below, which is an invitation for African Americans to discuss our oppression on Press TV. Interested persons can Dr. Randy Short, the project narrator, through his Facebook account at . He writes:

Dear Brothers and Sisters:

In conjunction with PressTV, several African American activists are creating a documentary to both discuss the grave problems of the African American National Minority group. Our focus is to show the glaring differentials in the broadly defined areas of Health, Education and Welfare as evidence of systematic neglect writ large and the existence of an inherent lack of will by the present socioeconomic and political structure of the United States to solve issues that hurt blacks disproportionately. Further, we are seeking scholars, activists, laypersons, and artists to help frame the current situation that faces African Americans to spur both national and international discussion and action on reversing the ethnocide of African Americans. We in particular want persons who work in the social services, schools, communities, judicial systems, and non-governmental agencies to provide relevant and understandable examples of systemic failure and neglect. This film is a call for people to discover their HUMAN RIGHTS. We wish to have use of photographs, film, and related visual materials to make the case for the need for the African American people to begin to see themselves as part of the global majority with a world where over 97% of the world's population lives outside of the USA. 

Our film crew is lead by Mrs. Marzieh Hashimi who is the only African American anchor with PressTV which is the Iranian government-owned television network that broadcast world-wide. Mrs. Hashimi is a native of Louisiana's Jefferson Parish. She was a student activist, and she immigrated to Iran to escape state-sponsored Islamophobia in the USA. Hashimi has been a powerful voice for the oppressed all over the world, and she is responsible for internationalizing the Trayvon Martin case--by having this story put in twenty-four hour rotation on PressTV 6 days before it was reported in the mainstream American media. Many credit Hashimi's prescience to helping spur the largest awakening of African Americans in twenty years. She has come to America to try to help empower her people to secure their God-given rights that their government seeks to deny them by prompting an international discussion and movement to demand the rights of the world's largest ethnic national minority group that is wholly oppressed similar to the Palestinians.

We want to go into the communities and homes of those people who know first-hand the issues that hold a people captive to the excesses of the so-called "American exceptionalism". We believe by looking at health, food, employment, education, and all the facets of the society we can demonstrate a pattern of oppression that is both insidious and obvious; however, so vast in some dimensions that those oppressed do not totally see scope and scale of their barriers to freedom. We aim to present before the world many of the answers to why some of the circumstances exist in the African American situation, and, more importantly, the goal is to explain that the African American people have never breathed free in 500 years as an indigenous people unique in their history and creation as a modern-day nation-within a nation.

Those interested in sharing their perspectives are welcome. We are devoted to linking the African American challenges to the issues of our corporate need for self-determination and dignity and control over our fate as a united people. Our team will be in Washington, D.C. from June 5th to the 9th, New York from June 9 to June 12th, and Atlanta the 13 and 14th of June. Please write me and let me know of your availability. Please email me. Our aim is not to present old failed solutions. We want new independent ideas and the input from those neither for sale or beholden to entities that are actively destroying a people.

Below is part of why some of us have decided we must tell the world about the trouble we've seen:

Death of Africans in America: Anglo American Ethnocide in 21st Century

In January 2009, the entire world witnessed the inauguration of President Barak Hussein Obama as the United States' first black president. The ascent of this son of a Kenyan and Anglo-American woman to hundreds of millions seemed to signal that the United States had overcome its long history stained by racism, slavery, xenophobia, and related intolerance. On the surface, African Americans could realistically aspire to hold the highest elected office in the United States. Nearly four years have passed since President Obama and his family settled in the White House, many intellectuals, activists, and clergy believe that the symbolism of a black president has done little for the situation of some 50 million African Americans. Since 2008, living standards and other indices of social well-being of African Americans, already in steep decline under former President George W. Bush, appear to have progressively gotten worse. African Americans are over represented in the negative social statistics in the United States. Given that they are a national minority that some have called a "nation within a nation", the constant flow of dismal by the American conglomerated media stories of bad health, prisons, crime, unemployment, poverty, the erosion of the family, AIDS, educational under-achievement, a toxic popular culture rife with hedonism, anomie, mediocrity, and the rare exceptional art and sport prodigies tossed in for cathartic relief appears to mask a far more serious matter. America was built on land acquired through genocide of the Native Americans who remain marginalized and confined to the periphery of society. It is accepted as an academic banality that there was a deliberate policy of genocide was implemented by the United States federal and states' governments to destroy Native Americans. Many of the negative stereotypes and social issues associated with African Americans are shared by Native Americans. Is this a coincidence?

In spite of the tremendous challenges faced by African Americans, millions have striven to leave the tobacco and cotton fields of serfdom of the South and urban slums to join the middle classes. For four centuries they have battled, mostly non-violently, against a racist, super-exploitative, and maniacally cruel Anglo-American Apartheid system as a pariah minority unaided and alone. They have had to struggle against a sophisticated oppressive system that has ever been able to mutate new methods of subjugation including an internalized caste system, forced economic dependency, eugenics, forced mass illiteracy,
imposed anomie, collective punishment, extrajudicial and judicial terror, systemic unjust enrichment, forced servitude, and the use of state and local agencies to erode family life. Miraculously in past generations, African Americans rose to the occasion and spawned movements each successive decade from the 1640s into the 1980s

Is it possible that the same America that was built by the bone, sinew, and backs of African laborers has desired to redux the old Indian Policy but refashioned for the blacks? Why is the land of the free and home of the brave so able to assimilate and receive into its middle classes virtually every other people under the sun but not its oldest population? Going beyond recitation of problems of African Americans, we want to look at root causes of troubling statistics and frightening demographic trends. The fact that nearly 11% of the world's prisoners are African American men who comprise less than a percent of the world's population poses serious questions about Americans society and how it treats its largest single ethnic group. As African communities are sacked by developers, farms stolen or seized via unjust means, schools shuttered, homes foreclosure, and data that points to a systematic program that is highly integrated and orchestrated, the world seems not to notice, and the gallant African American people appear to be fainting due to centuries of demographic fatigue resulting from centuries of oppression atavistic of the Anglo-American system of slow destruction.

The challenge of the African American might seem overwhelming, if not insurmountable; however, the options since the days of Abolition remain in place. The international community's power and influence has historically been in favor of black people. However, the established civil rights organizations in the 1940s waived their chances to truly address the African American question. Virtually all African American leaders that have sought to explore the use of international pressure as a tool to challenge injustice have been assassinated, overlooked, disappeared, or driven into exile. Nonetheless, Dr. Yussuf Naim Kly of the International Human Rights Association for American Minorities, a disciple of Malcolm X and a gifted writer an international lawyer, in the 1990s used the United Nations to combat the Los Angeles Police Department's brutal treatment of African American motorists Rodney King. Kly's small but well-educated and disciplined cadre of scholars and lawyers nearly forced the United States to face international scrutinity and sanction for the heinous abuse of its African American national minority ethny of over 45 million persons, which represents the largest single ethnic group in the world without any self-determination other than what is granted by a majoritarian democracy that stymies their self-development. Since 1990, a small but steady stream of African American activists, chief among these Queen Quett Macquette Goodwine of the Gullah Geechee Nation, have begun to demonstrate the potential of changing the reality of a people whose identity and historical formations was forged in chattelized slavery and centuries of gross human rights violations.

Today, we are seeking the freed voices of African American intellectuals, activists, artists, and laypersons that not only know the problems of their people but realize that the path blazed by William Patterson, Paul Robeson, Malcolm X, and Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to bring the United States before the world and demand reparations, reform, self-determination, and all human rights available to the African American people. The opinions are those of duly qualified persons able to see that the American duopoly of Republicans and Democrats hold no solution to the plight of the African Americans. They not bring their case for the professed America be prostrated to the truth of the practiced America.

If you would like to be a part of this project please notify me of your interests with all your contact information.
Dr. Randy Short, M.Div. (project narrator)
aka Hamid Samb (my original African name from Senegamibia)

Did someone say "freedom of press?" There should be three links in this article. Are there?

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